2012

Ravana’s airforce: a report on the state of Indian television

Abstract With over 800 television channels, India is not only the world’s third largest television market but also its most varied. Indian television for the past decade has been defined by an upward trend of continuous growth – in viewership numbers, revenues and advertising – and equally with a severe crisis of content across genres. […..]

Rings around India

He forced himself to jump off a plane: hoping to train his mind to work under extreme conditions, attempting somehow to simulate the pressures of the shooting range and the way his instincts would react under duress. If he had actually gone on to win in London, we would all have been going gaga about […..]

Contradictory trends in Indian television

In early 2008, India’s Zee News broadcast a ‘special investigation’. With a loud, red banner labelling the inquiry an ‘exclusive’, the program made two claims: first, it professed to have found definitive proof that Ravana, the mythical villain of the Ramayana, had maintained an air force. And second, the program revealed that it had found […..]

Discontent in green

The last time Samba was in the national headlines was when the Delhi High Court acquitted some of the accused officers from the infamous Samba spy case of the 1970s with full honours. That case is still being fought in the Supreme Court but for no fault of its own, this cantonment town near Jammu […..]

Beijing 2008: A Watershed for Indian Sport

Extracts from Olympics: The India Story, rev. and updated 2012 edition

The Games Politicians Play

The world turns on its axis, night comes after day, the Olympic Games are held every four years. The Olympics are so ubiquitous, so much a predictable, fixed feature of the rhythms of the world that it is easy to forget that they essentially began as a private initiative by a French aristocrat. In the […..]

Once there was a GANEFO

The world turns on its axis, night comes after day, the Olympic Games are held every four years. The Olympics are so ubiquitous, so much a predictable, fixed feature of the rhythms of the world that it is easy to forget that they essentially began as a private initiative by a French aristocrat. Amid the […..]