Public Policy

Supreme Court draws ‘Laxman Rekha’

Not since the Shah Bano case in the mid-1980s have the judiciary and executive faced the kind of stand-off that we are now seeing with a five-judge Constitutional Bench of the Supreme Court declaring the National Judicial Appointments Commission and 99th Constitutional Amendment Act “unconstitutional and void”. The Shah Bano case was very different from […..]

Europe versus Facebook

It all started with an Austrian student studying in California. A few years ago, whenMax Schrems found that Facebook was simply ignoring European privacy laws for users, he started a group called Europe versus Facebook and the beginning of challenge that has now culminated in a landmark ruling by the EU’s top court The European […..]

Getting a peon’s job harder than getting into Harvard

It’s seems it is more difficult to get a job as a peon in Uttar Pradesh than it is to get into Harvard. Consider this: Harvard University admitted 2081 students this year, for its class of 2019. They were the ones who made it out of 37,707 students who applied. That’s an admission ratio of […..]

BJP and the soldier

The Prime Minister’s second Independence Day speech from the Red Fort was received differently in different quarters but there is one political constituency where it got a clear thumbs down. A day after shocking images emerged of police action on protesting ex-soldiers agitating for one-rank-one-pension (OROP) at Jantar Mantar in the Capital, defence veterans reacted […..]

Narendra Modi’s Red Fort fizzle

The colour of the Prime Minister’s turban at the Red Fort had changed — from red in 2014 to mustard-yellow in 2015. So had the context. In 2014, Narendra Modi was the grand new hope of India, speaking like an outsider bringing new energy to the decaying pillars of power. Now, after a year and […..]

The soldier’s right: Why the arguments against one-rank-one-pension are misleading

INDIA-US-DIPLOMACY

Roman emperor Augustus started the tradition of military pensions in 13 BC by guaranteeing life pensions to every legionary who fought 20 years for Rome. It set the bar for all modern armies and Independent India continued the British tradition of financially privileging military service until 1973, when soldiers were paid more than civilian bureaucrats. […..]

MEDIA MATTERS

booklaunch panel

Social scientist Nalin Mehta examines the defective paver-blocks of regulations that line the pathways of Indian media, and suggests roadwork. One of the great risks of writing about television is that like cricket, everybody watches it, everybody has an opinion on it and everybody thinks they know exactly what the solution is,” writes Nalin Mehta […..]